The Story

Traveler, 2013, acrylic and ink on paper, 40" x 60"

My Burden (The Scar), 2011, acrylic and ink on paper, 30” x 23”

Encampment, 2011, acrylic and ink on paper, 23" x 30”

Witness,  2012, acrylic and ink on paper, 23" x 30”

Witness, 2012, acrylic and ink on paper, 23" x 30”

Border, 2011, oil on canvas, 48” x 54”

Summer Thaw, 2011, acrylic and ink on paper, 40" x 60"

Yellow Flowers, 2012, acrylic and ink on paper, 40" x 60"

The figures in The Story represents particular archetypes: pilgrims, messengers, deserters, and explorers step out of linear history and into an epic time of myth and stories. The scenes that unfold primarily picture the land around Minnesota’s Fort Snelling (Bdote) as an aftermath landscape of war and internment. For this work I also traveled to France and Belgium to research the almost century-old battlefields of the First World War. Having walked across that scarred land, I want to make visible an elusive residue, the traces of histories that still, mysteriously, affect us in the present. 

Melt, 2012, oil on canvas, 54” x 48”

Prayer To A Son, 2012, ink on paper, 24”x 24”

The Edge, 2011, acrylic and ink on paper, 23" x 30”

Twins, 2011, acrylic and ink on paper, 23" x 30”

The Messenger, 2012, oil on canvas, 36” x 48”

The Deserter, 2011, acrylic on canvas, 19” x 23”

Two Realms (White Mare), 2012, acrylic and ink on paper, 26" x 40”

The Watchtower, 2012, acrylic and ink on paper, 23" x 30”

Adrift

Rowboat, 2018, oil on panel

Orange and Green, 2018, oil on panel

Adrift, Installed, Augsburg University, 2018

Adrift, Installed, Augsburg University, 2018

Wall (Umbrella), 2018, oil on panel

Pink Ocean, 2018, oil on panel

1,000 Steps, 2018, oil and collage on panel

The paintings in Adrift deal with human migration and, in particular, the global refugee and migrant crisis. I felt morally obligated to make work that might add to the compassionate and sympathetic viewpoint supporting refugees seeking asylum and safety. As Susan Sontag points out, “the western memory museum is now mostly a visual one,” and for reference I used media images as inspiration or repurposed them by fixing them directly to the panel or canvas. This practice allows me to work within the conversation that already exists. The “seams” between the borrowed photographs and the painted surfaces are meant to be evident. Using photographs as an element in the work allows me to honor their existence, power, and gravity. The painted surfaces re-orient the original photos towards a more dream-like space where a reset or pause button can be hit that allows for reflection where shock and horror once reigned. 

Raft, 2018, oil on panel

Waiting, 2018, oil on panel

Pair, 2018, oil on panel

Figure, 2018, oil on panel

Adrift (left panel of triptych), 2018, oil and collage on canvas, 60” x 48” each

Adrift (right panel of triptych), 2018, oil and collage on canvas, 60” x 48” each

Adrift (center panel of triptych), 2018, oil and collage on canvas, 60” x 48” each

Adrift (rowboat detail, center panel), 2018, oil and collage on canvas, 60” x 48” each

Home, 2018, oil and collage on panel

Adrift, Installed, Augsburg University, 2018

Boat (Ochre-Green), 2018, oil and collage on panel

Untitled, 2018, oil and collage on panel

90° South

South Pole (Grave), 2012, acrylic on paper, 40” x 60”

Southern Swell, 2012, acrylic on paper, 40” x 60”

800 Miles, 16 Days, 2012, acrylic on paper, 40” x 60”

90° South, Installed, 2012, Minneapolis Institute of Arts

The Last March, 2012, acrylic on paper, 40” x 60”

This series 90° South began with a simple photograph. A photograph of a snow-covered “Scott tent” standing alone in the desolate Antarctic landscape. The photo, taken in 1912, launched my imagination into wondering about the lives of Antarctic explorers and what they endured for the sake of glory, fame and scientific discovery.  Robert Falcon Scott, a British explorer who died trying to reach the South Pole in 1912, wrote in his journal about Antarctica: “Great God this is an awful place.” I wanted to investigate what he could have meant by that phrase and depict a landscape that rejects notions of awe and the sublime in favor of a grittier reality.

Ocean Camp, 2012, acrylic on paper, 40” x 60”

The Lost Men (100 Years Ago), 2012, acrylic on paper, 40” x 60”

Honor Bound, 2012, acrylic on paper, 40” x 60”

Ghost (Triptych), 2012, acrylic on canvas, 30” x 84” each

Beset, 2012, acrylic on paper, 40” x 60”

90° South, Installed, 2012, Minneapolis Institute of Arts

Towards The Sun, 2011, acrylic on paper, 40” x 60”

Good Company, 2011, acrylic on paper, 40” x 60”